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(W)rapper as a "Timeless" Concept of Sustainable

Izzulhaq Alfaiz · May 22nd, 2023
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The construction of the (W)rapper office building combines previously existing and renovated buildings with new construction, advancing the history of sustainable development in Culver City and the Los Angeles area. Some of Eric Owen Moss' strategies include active and passive environmental sustainability, evidenced by high-performance building envelopes equivalent to an elevated LEED Silver sustainability rating. In addition, the building is integrated with public transportation. As a result, it simultaneously reduces the use of fossil fuels, with reduced availability of private and public car parking and a direct pedestrian path from the train to the building lobby.

Above view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

Above view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

In addition to that strategy, the project is also aligned with the City's long-term planning goals of increasing density along mass transit routes, in this case in neighborhoods that have historically been about industrial parks. Seventeen floors of offices are designed with three different floor height options, representing the vast spatial use and experience opportunities available to tenants. Adding to the concept of sustainable building, it provides a five times more earthquake-resistant structure than tall buildings in America. The structural life cycle 'reoccupy next day' of (W)rapper, a key measure of sustainability, and will reduce a project's carbon footprint substantially over its lifetime is another strategy offered by Architect Eric Owen Moss.

Above view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerAbove view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

Floor plan (W)rapper, Source by Eric Owen Moss ArchitectsFloor plan (W)rapper, Source by Eric Owen Moss Architects

Interior (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerInterior (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

(W)rapper is the only high-rise commercial office building in the U.S. that uses a basic insulated structure. The structural concept (W)rapper dated back to 1998 and was first presented in an exhibition at the Wexner Center in Columbus, Ohio. Unlike conventional high-rise structural systems based on columns arranged along modular lattice lines, (W)rappers are supported by a network of curved bands derived from several geometric center points. Each curved band is wrapped around the building's largely rectilinear envelope and folded around every vertical and horizontal corner until it reaches the ground. The band is supported on an insulated base foundation that separates the tower structure above from the insulator foundation below, allowing the building to respond and move safely and securely in any seismic event.

Front view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerFront view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

The concept of the structure (W)rapper, Source by Eric Owen Moss ArchitectsThe concept of the structure (W)rapper, Source by Eric Owen Moss Architects

The concept of the structure (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerThe concept of the structure (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

The steel tape is coated with refractory cement, and the core of the building is coated with double-layer cement plaster; there is no concrete in the structural or fireproof concept of (W)rapper. The ribbon is positioned on the perimeter of the building, creating an open floor plan without columns that provides maximum opportunities for interior planning options. The building's elevator and utility core is offset to the south, freeing up office interiors and providing maximum floor plan flexibility. Despite the extensive use of carbon-intensive materials such as steel in structures, Moss believes that this longevity will contribute to the building's carbon footprint in the long run.

Interior (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerInterior (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

Detail view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerDetail view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

Front view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom BonnerFront view (W)rapper, Photo by Tom Bonner

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Architecture · Sustainable ·